7 Things You Should Know Before Making a Major Career Decision

A friend of mine recently announced that his employer was closing the facility where he currently worked and moving its function to a larger facility about 600 miles away.

They gave him a choice: 1) relocate or 2) work remotely from home without relocating. Last I heard, he’d decided to relocate. His logic was as follows:

  1. As is typical in this sort of announcement, some of the coworkers at his facility were laid of rather than given a choice.
  2. The stated reason behind the relocation was to increase the amount of contact between employees in hopes of creating a more collaborative culture.
  3. Working from home would place him out of the collaborative loop and thus make him more likely to be laid off in the future.

While I understand his logic, I’m not sure he’s made the right decision.

Based upon what I’ve seen and experienced in the corporate world, there are seven essential truths to consider before making any major career decision.

1. There is no such thing as job security.

Millions of people have pursued their careers under the assumption that if they do the job required of them–and do it well–t they’ll remained employed and even get regular, reasonably-sized raises. And millions of people, having made huge sacrifices for their employers, have gotten fired anyway.

2. Always have options in your back pocket.

In my most recent book, Business Without the Bullsh*t, I recommend always having at least three different job opportunities under development, as well as a written plan for what you’d do, and who you’ll call, should you lose your job or decide to leave. If you’ve got options, your employer can’t bully. You make decisions based on opportunity not fear.

3. Know your true value to your company.

All companies, large or small, want to compensate you as little as possible while getting you to create (for them) as much value as possible. By contrast, it’s in your interest to get your compensation as close as possible to the value you’re creating, allowing for a fair profit to your employer. Essential question: how much would it cost to replace you?

4. Bad managers love management fads.

Thirty years ago, it was Total Quality Management; twenty years ago, it was Reengineering; ten years ago, it was Disruptive Innovation; today it’s the Collaborative Office. Popular management panaceas, at best, serve as corporate productivity taxes.  Worst case, they actively drive companies out of business. Be forewarned.

5. Do the numbers before you decide.

Consider the hidden costs before making any career decision. In my friend’s case, working from home eliminates commute time. Adding, say, an hour commute (both ways) to a 50-hour work week is the equivalent to a 20 percent pay cut! Similarly, relocating away from extended family could mean increased child-care costs. Always do the math!

6. Never make a career decision out of fear.

Fear is a useful emotion for making short-term decisions like “Should I try to pet that strange dog?” Fear is worse than useless, how, when making long-term decisions like “Where should I work?” or “What should I do for a living?” Making career decisions out of fear tends to land people in jobs that they hate and miss opportunities for jobs they’d truly enjoy.

7. The true measure of success is happiness.

As I’ve pointed out previously, it’s better to be happy and poor than miserable and rich. Of course, it’s easier to be happy when you don’t need to worry about money but past a certain point, it’s harder to achieve more happiness than more money. With this in mind, most people are happier when they work for home

Tech

Facebook pushes ad overhaul before 2018 U.S. election: executive

SAN JOSE, Calif. (Reuters) – Facebook Inc has begun overhauling how it handles political ads on its platform and may put some changes in place before U.S. elections next year, Facebook’s chief technology officer said on Wednesday.

U.S. congressional and state elections set for November 2018 present a deadline of sorts for Facebook and other social media companies to get better at halting the kind of election meddling that the United States accuses Russia of.

“We are working on all of this stuff actively now, so there is a big focus in the company to improve all of this on a regular basis,” Facebook CTO Mike Schroepfer said in an interview.

“You’re going to see a regular cadence of updates and changes,” he said, speaking on the sidelines of a conference that Facebook is hosting about virtual reality technology.

Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg said last month that the company would begin treating political ads differently from other ads, including by making it possible for anyone to see political ads, no matter whom they target. U.S. lawmakers had begun calling for regulations.

Disclosures by Facebook, Twitter Inc and Alphabet Inc’s Google that their products were battlegrounds for Russian election meddling last year have turned into a crisis for Silicon Valley.

Facebook’s chief operating officer, Sheryl Sandberg, is in Washington this week meeting U.S. lawmakers.

Moscow has denied allegations of meddling in last year’s U.S. presidential election.

Implementing changes is tricky, Schroepfer said, because Facebook does not want to stifle legitimate speech and because of the volume of material on Facebook, the world’s largest social network with 2 billion users and 5 million advertisers.

“We’re investing very heavily in technical solutions, because we’re operating at an unprecedented scale,” he said.

Facebook is also using humans. The company said this month it would hire 1,000 more people to review ads and ensure they meet its terms.

Schroepfer, 42, has been Facebook’s CTO since 2013 and previously was director of engineering. He also sits on Facebook’s board of directors.

Facebook has dealt with problematic user-generated content in the past, he said.

“We don’t want misuse of the platform, whether that’s a foreign government trying to intercede in a democracy – that’s obviously not OK – or whether it’s an individual spewing hate or uploading pornography,” he said.

Reporting by David Ingram; Editing by Kim Coghill

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Samsung Gear VR launches before December for $99

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We already knew Samsung’s final Gear VR was coming in 2015. Now we have a price and a better sense of the release timing.

The mobile-based virtual reality headset will launch in North America “in time for Black Friday” and worldwide “shortly after,” as Samsung SVP of Technology Strategy Peter Koo revealed when he took the stage at the Oculus Connect keynote on Thursday. It’ll sell for $ 99.

The final build of the Gear VR is 22% lighter than the “Innovator Edition” that first launched in Dec. 2014. It’s also got a revised design that does away with the top head strap and a smarter design for the side-mounted touchpad, with an directional pad-shaped indentation that should make blindly operating the controls more convenient. Read more…

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